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teeething:

You may bury my body
down by the highway side
So my old evil spirit
Can catch a Greyhound bus and ride

- Robert Johnson, Me and the Devil Blues

(via hellotailor)

Source: teeething
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That was the most sexual tension I have ever seen in a conversation about documents.

(via stupidfuckingquestions)

Source: lhmccoys
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sootonthecarpet:

what if instead of a same gender detective partnership who keep getting mistaken for a romantic couple, you had a same gender romantic couple who keep getting mistaken for detectives
‘hello, I’m sam darling, and this is my partner gregory hitch’ ‘AH YES THE PRIVATE DETECTIVES’ ‘what??? no we just came for some ice cream why is there police tape everywhere’

(via hellotailor)

Source: sootonthecarpet
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anasaltukhaifi:

Umbrellas Street, Portugal.

(via emmyc)

Source: jasmineberryful
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http://hellotailor.tumblr.com/post/82761250606/ennuijolras-okay-so-alan-tudyk-is-at-new

ennuijolras:

okay so alan tudyk is at new orleans comic con

and someone asked him one of his favorite memories from filming firefly and he told the best story from filming “objects in space”

so basically since wash and zoe and most of the crew are locked in their rooms for the episode,…

Source: ennuijolras
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mizzkatonic:

darthclarke:

Fuckin made my night.

OH MY GOD I HAD NO IDEA

Source: quiet-isle
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In Britain, make-up might have been hard to find, but it was worn with pride and became a symbol of the will to win. ‘Put your best face forward,’ encouraged a 1942 Yadley advertisement in Churchillian tones. ‘War, Woman and Lipstick' ran a celebrated Tangee campaign. Bright red was the favourite wartime colur for lips and nails and lipstick names were often patriotic: Louis Phillippe's Patriotic Red; Fighting Red by Tussy and Grenadier - The new Military red created by Tattoo, effective with air force blue and khaki.

During wartime, a subtle change had taken place in the marketing and the perception of make-up. It was no longer about making a woman seem ‘dainty’, but making her look and feel strong. Rosie the Riveter became a wartime icon in the USA, representing the six million women working in factories for the war effort. [Rockwell] portrayed Rosie as a vast figure in work dungarees, her short sleeves revealing arms the size of prize-winning hams. Behind her hangs the stars and stripes, squashed carelessly under her feet is a copy of Adolf Hitler’s Mein Kampf, and on her mighty lap rests a lunch box and a huge riveting machine like an enormous gun. [Her] henna red curls, lipsticked mouth and painted finger nails stress her femininity, emphasising the fact that make-up too was a weapon of war [Madeleine Marsh, Compact and Cosmetics: Beauty from the Victorian Times to the Present Day]

(via hellotailor)

Source: reyesrobbies